Where do actors go when their time as 007 is over? And should we call the babes Bond women now? Some of them are grandmothers, for goodness' sake.

Since Sean Connery slipped into the tux of James Bond in 1962's 'Dr. No.' the suave secret agent has enjoyed one of the most popular movie franchises in history.

Moviefone checks in with the men who have played Bond, the women who have loved him and the villains whose diabolical plans he's so cleverly foiled to see what they're up to today.

So sit back, grab your beverage of choice (martini, anyone?), and prepare to be both shaken AND stirred.

'James Bond': Where Are They Now?

    Since Sean Connery slipped into the tux of James Bond in 1962's 'Dr. No.' the suave secret agent -- as adept at bedding women as he is at defeating evildoers -- has enjoyed one of the most popular, lucrative and prolific movie franchises in history. There are villains so iconic (Dr. No, Blofeld, Jaws) and Bond babes of such exquisite beauty (Honey Ryder, Octopussy, Solitaire) that they are, quite literally, unforgettable.

    Moviefone checks in with the men who have played Bond, the women who have loved (and lusted for) him and the villains whose diabolical plans he's so cleverly foiled to see what they're up to today. So sit back, grab your beverage of choice (martini, anyone?), and prepare to be both shaken AND stirred. -- By Tom DiChiara

    Getty Images | Everett Collection (3)

    Sean Connery

    Then: In 1962, the relatively unknown Scot got his big break by originating the part (on the big screen) of the smooth-talking, lady-killing, shaken-not-stirred-martini-loving superspy in 'Dr. No.' Considered by most diehard aficionados to be the definitive Bond, Connery played the role in seven films, including 1983's 'Never Say Never Again' -- a remake of 1963's 'Thunderball' that isn't counted amongst the "official" 007 canon.

    Hulton Archive / Getty Images

    Sean Connery

    Now: After a long and storied career in which he played Indiana Jones' father, romanced a younger Catherine Zeta-Jones ('Entrapment') and won an Oscar ('The Untouchables'), Sir Sean (he was knighted in 2000) retired from acting after 2003's 'The League of Extraordinary Gentleman' turned out to be anything but. Despite rumors that he would appear in the new 'Indiana Jones,' Connery opted to remain retired and publish an autobiography, 'Being a Scot.' He can be found in his Scottish castle with wife Micheline Roquebrune, sipping -- we suspect -- martinis (shaken, not stirred, natch).

    Jon Kopaloff, FilmMagic

    George Lazenby

    Then: He took over the Bond reins for just one film, 1969's 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service,' before handing them back to Sean Connery for '71's, 'Diamonds Are Forever.' He had previously acted only in TV commercials -- he was the highest paid male model in Europe at the time -- but landed the role thanks to his arrogance, good looks and martial arts expertise (he studied under Bruce Lee). Though he received a Golden Globe nod and was offered a seven-picture deal by Bond producers, Lazenby declined to reprise the role, feeling that 007's popularity would wane in the hippie culture of the '70s. Good call.

    Larry Ellis, Hulton Archive / Getty Images

    George Lazenby

    Now: He never landed as plum a role as Bond again, but Lazenby continued to act throughout the '70s, '80s and '90s -- most notably in a trio of martial arts films in which he was slated to appear opposite Bruce Lee before Lee's untimely death. Lazenby semi-retired from acting in 1993 and fully retired in 2003. He occupies his time golfing, racing cars and playing tennis. In 2003, he married former tennis champ Pam Shriver, and they had three children together. Shriver filed for divorce in August 2008, citing "irreconcilable differences."

    Valerie Macon, Getty Images

    Roger Moore

    Then: Moore had already achieved fame as the star of TV's 'The Saint' before he succeeded Connery as Bond in seven films, commencing with 1973's 'Live and Let Die' and culminating with 1985's 'A View to a Kill.' His 12-year run as 007 is the longest to date, and also made him the oldest actor to play the spy (he was 58 when he turned in his tux). He is known for a more lighthearted playboy take on Bond and credited with mastering the spy's signature double entendre, off-the-cufflinks quips.

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    Roger Moore

    Now: Though he still acts occasionally -- and often ill-advisedly (a tacky role in '97's Spice Girls movie 'Spice World' AND a turn as a flamboyantly gay cross-dresser in the '02 Cuba Gooding Jr. turd 'Boat Trip' -- c'mon!), he devotes most of his time to charity work these days. A dedicated UNICEF goodwill ambassador since 1991, the four-times-married actor was granted knighthood in 2003 and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in October 2007. In 2008, he published his memoirs, entitled 'My Word Is My Bond.'

    Dominique Charriau, WireImage

    Timothy Dalton

    Then: With Roger Moore retiring, the classically trained theater actor was the first choice for 1987's 'The Living Daylights,' but had to turn down the part due to other commitments. The producers' next choice, Sam Neill, didn't screen-test well, and Pierce Brosnan had to back out due to his obligations to the TV show 'Remington Steele.' By this time, Dalton's schedule had freed up, and he stepped into Bond's dapper duds for 'Daylights,' and its '89 follow-up 'License to Kill.' While the latter film underperformed at the U.S. box office, the former was a hit, raking in more dough than rivals 'Die Hard' and 'Lethal Weapon.' Though Dalton wasn't a wildly popular choice for 007, diehard fans welcomed his darker, grittier take on the role.

    Everett Collection

    Timothy Dalton

    Now: Still working steadily in theater, TV and film, Dalton parodied James Bond in the 2003 flick 'Looney Toons: Back in Action.' That same year he appeared as Lord Asriel in the London stage version of 'His Dark Materials,' coincidentally the same role played by current 007 Daniel Craig in the 2007 movie 'The Golden Compass.' Most recently, he appeared in the '07 Brit comedy 'Hot Fuzz.' He lives in Los Angeles and has never been married.

    Jon Furniss, WireImage

    Pierce Brosnan

    Then: Having been forced to back out of the role in 1987, the Irish-born Brosnan finally got his shot at Bond-dom in 1995's 'GoldenEye,' after legal disputes compelled the franchise to take a six-year hiatus. The flick was an overwhelming success, with Brosnan hailed as the best 007 since Sean Connery and the film commended as a modernization of the franchise. Brosnan went on to appear in three more 007 films, ending his run with 2002's 'Die Another Day,' opposite a bikini-clad Halle Berry and a sword-wielding Madonna.

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