What if these men really ran for office?

As the national debate rages over who will make the better president, John McCain or Barack Obama, we invite you to answer a question <i>almost</i> as pertinent: Which movie president would make the best real-life commander-in-chief?

Click through to read the platforms of the 16 most memorable movie presidents, then tell us who gets your vote.

Results will be announced closer to the actual presidential election.


Best Movie Presidents: Vote

    As the national debate rages over who will make the better president, John McCain or Barack Obama, we invite you to answer a question almost as pertinent: Which movie president would make the best real-life commander-in-chief? Click through to read the platforms of the 16 most memorable movie presidents, then tell us who gets your vote. Results will be announced October 8.

    Everett / ZUMA Press / Buena Vista (2)

    Michael Douglas, 'The American President' (1995)

    Character: President Andrew Shepherd

    Platform: Seeking re-election, the Dem sells his environmental lobbyist girlfriend out for a pansy-ass crime bill. Still, he redeems himself by backing her bill, then issuing a stinging challenge to the Republican senator who attacked her ACLU-card-carrying ways: "If you want to talk about character and American values, fine. Just tell me where and when, and I'll show up."

    Universal Pictures / ZUMA Press

    Kelsey Grammer, 'Swing Vote' (2008)

    Character: President Andrew Boone

    Platform: The Republican incumbent favors traditional conservative values, yet he's also easily swayed. When the election comes down to a single vote (um, it could happen), he flip flops on the issues, becoming pro-environment and pro-gay marriage. At least there's one realistic thing about 'Swing Vote': Politicians will sell out their beliefs and tell you anything you want to hear to get your vote.

    Touchstone Pictures

    Morgan Freeman, 'Deep Impact' (1998)

    Character: President Tom Beck

    Platform: Consider national security our first black president's forte. Or rather national survival. When scientists discover a seven-mile wide asteroid torpedoing toward Earth, Beck devises a plan to build caves that can protect 1,000,000 people (to the other 304,191,000 Americans, Godspeed!). Good news: Beck saves humanity. Bad news: 1,000,000 votes is nothing in the electoral college.

    PARAMOUNT / ZUMA Press

    Dennis Quaid, 'American Dreamz' (2006)

    Character: President Joseph Staton

    Platform: Reading the newspaper is for chumps, ignorance is bliss and being President has nothing to do with knowing how to conduct foreign affairs. As long as you have your chief of staff to tell you what to do and a popular music television show on which to appear (and thus improve your ratings numbers), it's ALL good. Well, maybe not all.

    Universal

    Harrison Ford, 'Air Force One' (1997)

    Character: President James Marshall

    Platform: Never negotiate with terrorists -- even if they've hijacked Air Force One and are holding your family hostage. Instead, simply take a cue from Bruce Willis in 'Die Hard' and pick your captors apart piece by piece. See, the "zero tolerance" policy works -- and it's entertaining!

    Fotos International / Getty Images

    Billy Bob Thornton, 'Love Actually' (2003)

    Character: The U.S. President

    Platform: Walk softly and carry a big penis, er, stick, er, ego. He believes in the United States' unchallengeable hegemony, but he'll give allies like England whatever they need ... "so long as it's not something I don't want to give." Oh yeah, and he believes in keeping up foreign relations in other ways, such as trying to bed the British prime minister's saucy assistant.

    Universal

    Jack Nicholson, 'Mars Attacks!' (1996)

    Character: President James Dale

    Platform: President Dale is an optimist; he believes the Martians will come in peace, so he makes contact with their ships. We're sure he wishes he had a more restrictive illegal alien policy once it's clear that the ETs are gunning for the human race.

    Warner Bros. / Everett Collection

    James Cromwell, 'The Sum of All Fears' (2002)

    Character: President J. Robert Fowler

    Platform: Take a firm line on terrorism; never let emotion cloud logic; and always listen to Ben Affleck. When a nuclear bomb went off in Baltimore, Fowler prepared for a counterattack on likely culprit Russia, but had the fortitude to cancel it when he received intelligence from CIA analyst Jack Ryan (Affleck) suggesting that Russia was not responsible. Thanks, Ben!

    Paramount / Everett Collection

    Kevin Kline, 'Dave' (1993)

    Character: Dave Kovic/"President Bill Mitchell"

    Platform: You won't find a more "common man" in the oval office than Kovic. After all, that's just what he is, a generous temp agency owner (sort of like a community organizer, actually) and presidential impostor. A champion of the homeless, his main goal, of course, is to secure employment for every single American. FDR would approve.

    Northern Lights Entertainment / ZUMA Press

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