Rachel Getting MarriedAnne Hathaway, Keira Knightley and the Muscles From Brussels deliver memorable performances.

No, that is not a misprint. Day three of the festival brought another stellar performance from Keira Knightley, who is radiant and heartbreaking in 'The Duchess' and a career-best turn for Anne Hathaway as a vitriolic recovering drug addict in 'Rachel Getting Married.'

But perhaps the most interesting revelation of the day (and the festival so far) is that martial arts movie star Jean-Claude Van Damme, aka The Muscles From Brussels, can actually act, a talent he showcases almost as much as his biceps in the delightfully meta 'JCVD.'

Rachel Getting MarriedAnne Hathaway, Keira Knightley and the Muscles From Brussels deliver memorable performances.

No, that is not a misprint. Day three of the festival brought another stellar performance from Keira Knightley, who is radiant and heartbreaking in 'The Duchess' and a career-best turn for Anne Hathaway as a vitriolic recovering drug addict in 'Rachel Getting Married.'

But perhaps the most interesting revelation of the day (and the festival so far) is that martial arts movie star Jean-Claude Van Damme, aka The Muscles From Brussels, can actually act, a talent he showcases almost as much as his biceps in the delightfully meta 'JCVD.'

'Rachel Getting Married.': At first, it's tough to sympathize with Anne Hathaway's acid-tongued, self-centered Kym, a recovering drug addict who returns from rehab to attend her sister Rachel's (Rosemarie DeWitt) wedding -- she's prone to loud outbursts and lots of crying, and even uses the rehearsal dinner as a forum to complete one of the steps in the 12-step program. But Hathaway infuses Kym with such raw emotion and just enough vulnerability that one can't help but feel for her. Directed by Jonathan Demme ('The Silence of the Lambs'), 'Rachel' is bravely intimate, inviting the audience to be a guest at both the rehearsal dinner and the ensuing wedding -- though a 20-minute sequence towards the end where he simply shows people dancing at the reception feels a bit dragged out.

'The Duchess': Keira Knightley is at the top of her period-piece-loving game as the Duchess of Devonshire, a woman who believes in the strength of women and the power of love but is trapped in a marriage that threatens to strip her of both. As her cold, cheating hubby, Ralph Fiennes could find himself in the mix come Oscar time. And the film itself is surprisingly engaging for another period drama that treads on themes of female empowerment.

'JCVD': Jean-Claude Van Damme plays himself -- an aging action star relegated to competing with Steven Seagal for direct-to-DVD parts -- and it might be the role of a lifetime. Embroiled in a vicious custody battle and on the verge of bankruptcy, Van Damme finds himself mistaken for the ringleader in a bank heist turned hostage situation. As he attempts to extricate himself from the mess, The Muscles shows sides of himself we've never seen -- drawing the audience into his plight with a performance that's funny, sad and may just make your heart muscle ache for the big guy from Belgium.

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