Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist"I don't want to go. I'm taking a mental health day." -- Nick (Michael Cera) in 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist'

The 2008 Toronto International Film Festival got underway on Thursday, and so far the flicks have not disappointed.

'The Brothers Bloom', a quirky con-man caper/romance/drama/comedy (yes, it melds all those genres) from 'Brick' writer-director Rian Johnson proved to be a very unique concoction.

And the sweet, funny (and sometimes gross) 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist' marks another probable hit for 'Superbad' boy Michael Cera and '40-Year-Old Virgin' daughter Kat Dennings.

Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist"I don't want to go. I'm taking a mental health day." -- Nick (Michael Cera) in 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist'

The 2008 Toronto International Film Festival got underway on Thursday, and so far the flicks have not disappointed.

'The Brothers Bloom', a quirky con-man caper/romance/drama/comedy (yes, it melds all those genres) from 'Brick' writer-director Rian Johnson proved to be a very unique concoction.

And the sweet, funny (and sometimes gross) 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist' marks another probable hit for 'Superbad' boy Michael Cera and '40-Year-Old Virgin' daughter Kat Dennings.

'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist': Chronicling one crazy night in the life of mismatched teens Nick (Cera) and Norah (Dennings) on a quest to find Norah's misplaced (and inebriated) best friend (Ari Graynor) and a secret show by their elusive favorite band (the awesomely named Where's Fluffy?), this teen comedy mixes the hopeful romance of 'Before Sunset' and the raunchy humor of 'Superbad.' It's got tender moments and gross ones (let's just say you may never want to chew gum again after watching). And soundtrack music courtesy of indie stalwarts such as Band of Horses, The National and Vampire Weekend make this is one sweet 'Playlist.'

'The Brothers Bloom': Rian Johnson's writer-director follow-up to the undeniably unique high-school noir 'Brick' is just as original and twice as accessible. The tale of lifelong con men Stephen (Mark Ruffalo) and Bloom (Adrien Brody) who set out to scam quirky heiress Penelope (the beautifully zany Rachel Weisz) out of her fortune, the film has echoes of Wes Anderson -- Penelope boasts a cornucopia of "interesting" talents, the brothers travel to Greece on a steamboat -- but ultimately becomes something all its own. It works as a con caper, a sweet romance and a sibling dramedy. And, most importantly, it never cons the audience into caring about the characters; moviegoers will care about them just fine on their own.