"Girls need their team. The guys have the Yankees and the Mets ... Girls have those four girls."

You may know Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda, but what about the man behind the women?

Sex and the City' director Michael Patrick King knows more about making women happy than all of Samantha's lovers put together.

He talked to Moviefone about those death rumors, the secret origins of the Post-It breakup and the real divas of 'SATC' (the men, of course).


15 Questions w/ Michael Patrick King

    You may know Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda, but what about the man behind the women? 'Sex and the City' director Michael Patrick King, who was the show's exec producer for five of its six seasons, knows more about making women happy than all of Samantha's lovers put together. He talked to Moviefone about those death rumors, the secret origins of the Post-It breakup and the real divas of 'SATC' (the men, of course). -- By Patricia Chui

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    1. What was your reaction when the "death rumor" started circulating?
    If I had killed Mr. Big, I would be murdered. I would literally be stoned or stabbed by all the women in the world who love and hate him at the same time. The first thing I thought was, oh good, there's a lot of excitement around the movie. And then the next thing I thought was, I hope people don't come to the movie waiting all through the movie to see Mr. Big die. Get that out there, that no one dies. No one dies! Mr. Big did not die.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    2. Didn't the rumor originate with Cynthia Nixon?
    No, the fact of the matter is, she went and did some little off-off-Broadway talk show, and [the host] said, "Who dies?" I've seen the clip since, and all she does is smile. In the very, very long first version, Steve's mother did die. Then when I got into the reality of how much I could put on the screen and what the weight of the movie was, I knew that I didn't need a death.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    3. How did some of the other rumors get started?
    All the entertainment news shows had video cameras. I'd go home and see the day's work I'd done on 'Access Hollywood' before I'd seen my actual dailies. Anything people heard that they didn't understand, they started making [up] storylines. You know, Mr. Big's [last] name is Preston, and there was a scene where somebody said, "Carrie Bradshaw Preston?" So that night on 'Access Hollywood,' I saw: "Carrie Bradshaw's Pregnant." Preston, pregnant. It was crazy.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    4. What did you do to get "back in shape" for this movie?
    I had to do these emotional pushups to get the voice of the fans out of my head. All I could think about when I sat down to write was, "Don't disappoint them. Don't disappoint them." And I also had to find a way to evolve the characters. The big mistake would've been to start where they were, and try to pretend nothing had changed, because the audience had changed. They all evolved in four years, so the characters should, too.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    5. The scene where Carrie wears wedding dress after wedding dress for a Vogue photo shoot is like fashion porn. How did that come about?
    I thought, one wedding gown won't be enough! I wanted to do an almost MGM kind of floating camera over this opulence of couture. And that's all authentic. The diamond orchid [Carrie] has on her head when she's wearing the Carolina Herrera dress, Anna Wintour took them off a model on John Galliano's runway and brought it back from Paris in her luggage. And put it on Carrie's head. It's the best of the best of the best. But it is, it's fashion porn. It is fashion crack.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    6. Were there any obstacles to shooting at the New York Public Library?
    The problem with the public library is, it's open seven days a week. The day we were filming Carrie and the girls going up the stairs, there were 400 people there. The A.D. had a bullhorn and was standing on a ladder, and everybody was behind barricades, and she was saying, "Everybody take your pictures now!" And we'd hear, "click click click ..." and she'd say, "STOP." And I would say "Action," it'd be quiet, you'd hear the lines, and I would say, "Cut," and there'd be applause. It was like filming and theater combined.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    7. With all these crazy fans, did anyone ever do anything bizarre?
    We were filming the CharlotteMr. Big scene, in front of the restaurant when she's very pregnant, and there was a fire drill in the Catholic high school across the street, and all the girls came pouring onto the street in their Catholic plaid uniforms, screaming, and running directly into the shot and going up to Mr. Big and going, "We love you!" And [Chris Noth] said, "Aren't you supposed to be in school?" And two girls said, "Abso-f***ing-lutely."

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    8. Do you have a favorite place in New York that got overrun because of, well, you?
    No, because the great thing about New York City is that it's always changing. You know when people say to me, like, look at all those girls in heels and dresses downtown, look what you did, isn't that a shame? And I always think, do you say that when you see guys wearing Mets jackets going to Shea Stadium? It's the same thing. Girls need their team. The guys have the Yankees and the Mets ... Girls have those four girls.

    Craig Blankenhorn/New Line Cinema

    9. What did you used to want to be when you grew up?
    When I was little, I used to put on shows in my backyard using all my sisters and the neighborhood girls, and I was never in the shows, I was always putting them on, grabbing gowns out of my mother's attic and putting them on these girls and telling them where to walk and standing on a picnic table as a stage. It was very much what I'm doing now, but it was really about making up stories and being happy that women would participate with me and do what I asked.

    Anita Bugge, WireImage.com