• Paul Scofield (1922-2008) - British actor (pictured) who won an Oscar for his portrayal of Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons and who was nominated again almost thirty years later for his supporting role in Quiz Show. He also co-stars in Frankenheimer's The Train, Branagh's Henry V, Zeffirelli's Hamlet, Hytner's The Crucible and Michael Winner's Scorpio, and he played the title role in Peter Brook's King Lear. He narrated the documentaries London and Robinson in Space and voiced the part of Akira Kurosawa in the documentary Kurosawa. He died of leukemia March 19, in West Sussex, England. (NY Times)
  • Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) - Oscar-nominated screenwriter of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Best known as a science fiction author, he wrote the novel-turned-film 2010, and his novels Rendezvous with Rama and Childhood's End are also currently being adapted. See Richard's full post for details of his death.
  • Hugo Claus (1929-2008) - Belgian filmmaker, novelist and playwright. He wrote the screenplay for the 1958 Oscar nominee Dorp Aaan De Rivier and his directorial work includes the Berlin Film Festival nominee Vrijdag and an adaptation of his play De Verlossing. He died March 19 in Antwerp, Belgium. (BBC)
  • Ivan Dixon (1931-2008) - Actor and director who appears in Otto Preminger's adaptation of Porgy and Bess. He later directed his own version of the play for television. He also appears in the 1961 adaptation of A Raisin in the Sun and in A Patch of Blue, both starring his Porgy co-star Sidney Poitier, for whom he also doubled in The Defiant Ones. He was best known for his regular role on TV's Hogan's Heroes; he appears in Car Wash and he directed Trouble Man and The Spook Who Sat By the Door, which he also produced. He died of a hemorrhage March 16, in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Variety)
  • Philip Jones Griffith (1936-2008) - Photojournalist famous for shots he took during the Vietnam War. He also took still photos for the production of The Deer Hunter. He died of cancer March 18, in London. (International Herald Tribune)
  • William Hayward (c.1942-2008) - Associate producer of Easy Rider. He also produced Peter Fonda's films The Hired Hand, Wanda Nevada and Idaho Transer and Michelle Manning's Blue City. His father was Oscar-nominated and Tony-winning producer Leland Hayward (Mister Roberts); his mother was Oscar-nominated actress Margaret Sullivan (Three Comrades); and his sister is actress Brooke Hayward, who was formerly married to Dennis Hopper. He shot himself in the heart with a handgun March 9, in Castaic, California. (Variety)
  • Raymond Leblanc (1915-2008) - Belgian publisher of Tintin graphic novels, via the company he founded, Lombard. He also produced the 1969 animated adaptation of Tintin and the Temple of the Sun and then executive produced and directed 1972's Tintin and the Lake of Sharks. He produced two animated Astérix movies, Astérix the Gaul and Astérix and Cleopatra, and a fantasy film from the creators of Astérix, titled Les Gaspards (U.S. title: The Down-in-the-Hole Gang), as well as another comic adaptation titled Daisy Town, and a live-action/animation mixed adaptation of Gulliver's Travels, starring Richard Harris in the title role. He died March 22. (Comic Mix)
  • Israel "Cachao" López (1918-2008) - Cuban musician credited as creator of the mambo. He can be seen in the documentaries Calle 54, Cachao ... Como Su Ritmo No Hay Dos and the recently completed Celia: The Queen. He died after complications from kidney failure March 22, in Coral Gables, Florida. (Telegraph)
  • Arthur Lyons (c.1946-2008) - Author of the novel Castles Burning, which became the 1986 TV movie Slow Burn starring Johnny Depp and Eric Roberts. He also founded the Palm Springs Film Noir Film Festival. He died of complications from pneumonia and a stroke March 21. (KESQ)
  • Wildred R. Middlebrooks (1933-2008) - Bass player who backed Ella Fitzgerald. He also appears in Scorsese's New York, New York as the bass player in the Palm Club. He died of heart failure March 13, in Pasadena, California. (LA Times)
  • Anthony Minghella (1954-2008) - Oscar-winning director of The English Patient. He also received an Oscar nomination for that film's screenplay and later for writing the script to his film The Talented Mr. Ripley. He also wrote and directed Truly Madly Deeply, Cold Mountain, Breaking and Entering and the upcoming The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency. See Monika's full post for details of his death.
CATEGORIES Obits, Cinematical