You always have to worry when you hear "record year." Such feats make shoes hard to fill, or you do fill them, only to slam into that ceiling quicker than you realize. In 2006, Bollywood had a record year -- based on a small number of the 200 films made. Many barely covered production costs, but there were enough enormous hits -- like Krishh and Dhoom 2 -- that brought in huge enough earnings to balance things out. Last year, it was said that Bollywood's success was due to reversing the trend of "clichéd love stories and predictable family dramas to experiment with new themes." This year marks a return to formula, and a mass disappearance of revenue.

According to the CBC, Bollywood is already suffering a 40% drop in revenues since last year, when comparing the same periods -- a loss that amounts to approximately $36 million US. Out of the 55 films that have screened so far, 45 have bombed -- this includes Fool N Final, which I told you about when Mike Tyson decided to lend his moves to the film's music video. The only films to do relatively well are Namastey London (which has grossed just over $15 million worldwide) and Guru (sitting at just over $24 million).

Instead of opening their arms to the traditional plots of boy-meets-girl and song-and-dance, Indian audiences are looking elsewhere -- mainly at low-budget flicks and Hollywood sequels. I guess if you're sick of your own regurgitated schlock, why not delight in another country's? While many of us stateside aren't happy with the state of sequels this summer, Shrek the Third, Spider-Man 3 and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End are doing well where they used to fail, according to Indian film-sector analyst Taran Adarsh: "They have gained popularity because they have started dubbing their films in multiple Indian languages." One person's disappointment is another's...