Before the weekend hits, here are some just-made deals:
  • The duo who brought us the likes of Chicken Little, Steve Bencich and Ron Friedman, have just sold their latest pitch, The Devil You Know, to 20th Century Fox. The film will be an adaptation of Nathan Hale's children's book, and while they're known for their animated films, this will be live-action. The books are about the Fell family, who share their house with a literal "little devil." The get fed up with his trouble-making, and call on Ms. Phisto (a spoof on Mary Poppins and Mephistopheles) to get rid of him and take his place. However, she proves to be more trouble -- she brings in boxes full of demons and calls a lake of fire and brimstone in the kitchen. How the pair are handling the adaptation is being kept under wraps, but hopefully it will maintain the charm and quirkiness of the original.
  • The writer/director who brought us Camp in 2003, Todd Graff, is gearing up for another teen movie fueled by music. He is currently re-writing Josh Kagan's coming-of age dramedy -- Will. It is about an outcast in high school who befriends a popular girl because of their love for music. They bring together "a like-minded crew of misfits," form a rock group and plan to compete in their school's battle of the bands. Basically, it's just like Camp, but not at camp. Stay tuned for his upcoming films about misfits joining to form an air band for the local talent show, students doing a music internship over Spring break and wacky hi-jinx from a high school chorus class.
  • In October, Mark Beall reported that Mark Waters, The House of Yes and Mean Girls, was going to be directing Walden's Media's upcoming film on Harry Houdini. Slowly but surely, the project is coming together and they've finally got a screenwriter. Variety has reported that Brett Merryman will be grabbing the pen to write the story about a 14-year-old boy who finds out that he is a Houdini descendant -- and decides to go on a quest to unlock the secrets of his famous ancestor. I'm waiting to see if the film gets the word "house" in it. Three out of the four films the screenwriter has been involved with have has it in the title.