After a few years to ingest and come to terms with what happened on September 11, it was time for the U.S. to start dealing with the trauma cinematically. Obviously, the first wave consisted of heroic stories made to wow and inspire us in the face of tragedy. World Trade Center gave us the struggle of two police officers trapped in the rubble of the Twin Towers. United 93 gave us an imagined account of what happened on the doomed flight that crashed in Pennsylvania. Now, German director Christian Alvart (Case 39) is set to direct an adaptation of Jess Walter's recent political satire, The Zero.

Published in 2006, and compared to the likes of Joseph Heller's Catch 22, Zero deals with a heroic cop named Brian Remy -- except that in the first few pages he wakes up to find that he's shot himself in the head. In what I can only assume is a Fight Club sort of deal, Remy continues from there, dealing with his son who feels neglected, and a strange mental state that results in him seeing "flashers and floaters" in his eyes -- all the while starting a new job that has him examining the millions of paper scraps that rained down on the city as the towers fell, and finding himself in a sinister goverment plot. Obviously, the film will not so big on the tear-inducing heroicism. There is no cast listed yet, but with a large talent pool to pick from, I'm sure Remy will get great actor treatment.