It's hard to believe it, but here we are at the end of another year of Sundance already, with awards being handed out this evening.

The Grand Jury Prize for Documentary Competition went to Manda Bala (Send a Bullet), directed by Jason Kohn, about political corruption in Brazil.

The Grand Jury Prize for Dramatic Competition was awarded to Padre Nuestro, directed by Christopher Zalla, about a man with a criminal past who hops a truck carrying illegal immigrants to New York City.

The World Cinema Jury Prize for a Documentary went to Enemies of Happiness/Denmark, directed by Eva Mulvad and Anja Al Erhayem. The film is about MalalaiJoya, a 28-year-old Afghani woman, whose 2005 victory in Afghanistan's first democratic election in over 30 years redefined the role of women in Afghanistan.

The World Cinema Jury Prize for a Dramatic film went to Sweet Mud/Israel, directed by Dror Shaul, about a boy living in a kibbutz, and what happens when his mentally ill mother is abandoned by the community.

The big audience awards went to Grace is Gone, directed by James C. Strouse, for Dramatic Film, and to Hear and Now, directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, for Documentary Film. The World Cinema Audience Awards went to documentary In the Shadow of the Moon, directed by David Sington, and to Dramatic film Once, helmed by John Carney.

See the full list of Sundance Award Winners after the jump:

Grand Jury Prize, Documentary:
Manda Bala, directed by Jason Kohn

Grand Jury Prize, Dramatic: Padre Nuestro, directed by Christopher Zalla

The World Cinema Jury Prize, Documentary: Enemies of Happiness, directors Eva Mulvad and Anja Al Erhayem.

The World Cinema Jury Prize, Dramatic: Sweet Mud, directed by Dror Shaul.

World Cinema Competition Documentary Special Jury Prize: Hot House, directed by Shimon Dotan.

World Cinema Dramatic Competition Special Jury Prize: The Legacy, directors Géla Babluani (who was here last year with 13 Tzameti) and Temur Babluani.

Independent Film Competition Documentary Special Jury Prize: No End in Sight, directed by Charles Ferguson, "in recognition of the film as timelywork that clearly illuminates the misguided policy decisions that have led to the catastrophic quagmire of the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq."

Special Jury Prize for Singularity of Vision: Chris Smith, The Pool

Special Jury Prize for Acting, Independent Dramatic Film: Jess Weixler, for Teeth and Tamara Podemski for Four Sheets to the Wind

Excellence in Cinematography, Documentary: Heloisa Passos, for Manda Bala

Excellence in Cinematographcy, Dramatic: Joshua, Benoit Debie

Independent Film Competition Documentary Jury, Editing: Hibah Sherif Frisina, Charlton McMillian, and Michael Schweitzer for their work on the film Nanking.

Waldo Scott Screenwriting Award: Grace is Gone, James C. Strouse

Independent Film Competition, Directing, Documentary: War/Dance, Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine

Independent Film Competition, Directing, Dramatic: Rocket Science, Jeffrey Blitz

AUDIENCE AWARDS:

Audience Award, Documentary: Hear and Now, directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky

Audience Award, Dramatic: Grace is Gone, directed by James C. Strouse

The World Cinema Audience Award for Documentary: In the Shadow of the Moon, directed by David Sington.

World Cinema Audience Award for Dramatic Film: Once, helmed by John Carney.


The Alfred P. Sloan prize for a feature film with science as a theme, or featuring a scientist or mathemetician main character, was awarded to Dark Matter, directed by Chen Shi-Zeng and written by Billy Shebar, Dark Matter is about Liu Xing ( Liu Ye), a brilliant Chinese student who comes to work with his idol, Jacob Reiser (Aidan Quinn) a cosmologist studying the origins of the universe. Liu becomes his idol's protege, but when he becomes obsessed with the theory of dark matter, which directly conflicts with Reiser's work, everything is thrown into jeopardy. As the winner of the Alfred P. Sloan prize, the film receives a $20,000 award.

The Sundance Institute and NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) announced the winners of the Sundance/NHK International Filmmakers Awards, which go to film directors from four global regions (Europe, Latin America, United States and Japan). Each winner receives a $10,000 award and guarantee by the NHK to purchase Japanese broadcast rights upon completion of their project. This years winners are: Lucía Cedrón, Agnus Dei, from Latin America; Caran Hartsfield, Bury Me Standing, from the United States; Tomoko Kana, Two by the River, from Japan; and Dagur Kári, The Good Heart, from Europe.


The Shorts Special Jury Prize for Short Filmmaking: Freeheld, by director Cynthia Wade.

Jury Prize for International Short: The Tube With a Hat, directed by Radu Jude from Romania.

Jury Prize for Short Filmmaking was awarded to Everything Will Be OK, directed by Don Hertzfeldt.

WHO DECIDES?

The 2007 Independent Film Competition Documentary Jurors are Alan Berliner, Lewis Erskine,
Lauren Greenfield, Julia Reichert, and Carlos Sandoval.

The 2007 Independent Film Competition Dramatic Jurors are Catherine Hardwicke, Dawn Hudson,
Pamela Martin, Elvis Mitchell and Sarah Polley.

The 2007 World Cinema Competition Documentary Jurors are Raoul Peck, Juan Carlos Rulfo, and
Elizabeth Weatherford.

The 2007 World Cinema Competition Dramatic Jurors are Carlos Bolado, Lynne Ramsay, and U-Wei
Bin Haji Saari.

The 2007 Shorts Jurors presenting awards to U.S. and international short films are Jared Hess, Daniela
Michel, and Mark Elijah Rosenberg.