I'm not exactly sure at what age a person is officially grown-up. Some would say you're an adult at 18, Jews feel you're a man at 13. Me, I'm pushing 30, and my wife still calls me a little twit. The way I see it, I'll never be a grown-up because, as each year passes, there will still be more to accomplish, lessons to learn and experiences to encounter.

The following films all feature characters who are going through the process of growing up, be it mentally or physically. Some are youngsters looking to explore new feelings and emotions, while others are older, stuck between the secrets of their past and a troubling future. Welcome to this week's Trailer Park ...

  • Based on the popular play (which recently won 6 Tony Awards), The History Boys is now heading for the big screen. Written by Alan Bennett, pic (and play) tells of a group of unruly students who learn the meaning of education while dabbling sex, sports and the act of growing up.
  • Back when this film first premiered at Sundance, it had a different title (Stay), and was known primarily as that weird little Bobcat Goldthwait film about a girl who, um, goes down on her dog. Well, the title has been changed to Sleeping Dogs Lie and, based on the trailer, this looks to be a pretty swell story about how one little secret can put a dent in a seemingly perfect relationship.
  • One of the films I'm most looking forward to this fall is A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints. Starring Robert Downey Jr., Rosario Dawson, Shia LeBeof and Chazz Palminteri, pic is a coming-of-age drama about a boy growing up in Astoria, New York during the 1980s. Drugs, prison, sex -- this film reminds me of an edgier Bronx Tale. Have to see it, like, now.
  • Written and directed by Jeremy Brock, Driving Lessons tells the story of a Ben Marshall (Rupert Grint), an awkward teenager whose world begins to change once he starts working for a somewhat eccentric retired actress (Julia Waters). Fun and light, this one looks to have 'sleeper hit' written all over it.
  • Directed by Bob Odenkirk (of Mr. Show fame), Let's Go To Prison stars Will Arnett and Dax Shepard (Is this dude the new Rob Schneider? He seems to star in one stupid film after another.) as two men from opposite sides of the tracks who wind up sharing the same prison cell. Hilarity ensues.