Now showing at the MOMA is "Tomorrowland," the aptly-named exhibit of three decades of filmwork by filmmakers and video artists who studied at the California Institute of the Arts. Founded in 1961, CalArts is the product of Walt Disney, who wanted to bring together the visual and the performing arts in one school. Their famous animation program boasts alumni who have gone on to work for Pixar, Disney, Laika and just about every other major animation company. The Village Voice has a review of the show; "Tomorrowland" appears to represent a style that is at once commerical and avant-garde. Ed Halter cites mainstream folks like the Pixar team and Pee-Wee Herman (I also believe that David Hasselhoff attended the art school), as well as artists like John Baldessari and Joanna Priestly. Manohla Dargis also gives a review of the show and an extensive background of CalArts for The New York Times. Despite being founded by Disney, the school has managed to hold onto its more experimental, purely artistic side: "Perhaps because of its freewheeling early history (courses in joint rolling and witchcraft). Or because its campus is at a geographic remove from the Disney studio in Burbank." (CalArts is located in the little suburb of Valencia, CA). Witchcraft, Tim Burton, David Salle, and a freedom to commit to art versus industry? I kind of wish I went to this art school . . .